HM THEMES
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tattoohistorian:

A couple very spring-like tattoos in here. Love the floral branch with caterpillar and snail! From Ottolenghi via Guerrieri (1912)

tattoohistorian:

A couple very spring-like tattoos in here. Love the floral branch with caterpillar and snail! From Ottolenghi via Guerrieri (1912)

timur-i-lang:

Construction of the fort of Khavarnaq, by Bihzad
Herat, ca. 1494-1495 C.E.

timur-i-lang:

Construction of the fort of Khavarnaq, by Bihzad

Herat, ca. 1494-1495 C.E.

starlock:

↣ HB! CHAPTER TWO START ↢

↣ READ FROM THE BEGINNING ↢

MangaMagazine mirror

support HOTBLOOD! on Patreon

THE WEBCOMIC ABOUT GAY WESTERN CENTAURS IS BACK with a vengeance and a timeskip! I’m happy to report that I was able to make excellent use of the break and all of the preorders for the first volume are out the door, I quit my part-time foodservice job, and it was replaced instantly with several other exciting things! 

In other news, I’ll be at Anime Boston, Emerald City Comic Con, and MoCCA Fest with copies of Vol.1 (as well as a few prints), and I hope to see some of you there!!!

THANKS FOR READING!!

♥ TORIL

drawingtutor:

Adrian Madej brush creation tut 

drawingtutor:

Adrian Madej brush creation tut 

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glitterghoul:

adorable

glitterghoul:

adorable

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camille-andre-book:

As a student in animation, I am currently working on my graduation movie.

I share with you a concept art I did in 2013 for this character.
(Because I wanted it white, I painted it in black before \°<°/ )

victongai:

The Cloisters NY Subway Poster

Victo Ngai

When I visited NY as a student, I remember seeing all the beautiful subway art-cards and posters, I would look at them with dazed eyes and tell myself : one day. 

When Amy Hausmann, Deputy Director of MTA Arts for Transit and Urban Design, asked me if I would like to design one of the two 2014 NY Subway posters, I was beyond myself. 

The Cloisters is one of my favorite places in New York. It’s proximity to the heart of New York city makes it surreal, the short train ride transforms mid-town skyscrapers to a medieval abbey like a time machine. To me, The Cloisters is the perfect subject for the poster theme: “Fantastic Ride of MTA”. The format of this piece was inspired by the beautiful Unicorn tapestry displaying in the museum. To make it more contemporary and further embrace the idea of time travel, modern visitors are venturing into the world where mythological creatures and medieval hunters exit. I also sneaked in many small details which I hope viewers will have fun discovering: such as a dog chasing a squirrel, a fat tourist family which the sons look like clones of the father, the kissing puppy lovers. etc

These posters are slowly being put up in stations around NY, it makes me really happy getting emails with photos of the poster in context and people telling me how the posters have enticed them to visit The Cloisters. The photo above are taken by friend and fellow illustrator Daniel Fishel. 

Thank you all so much who came out during the snow for the MTA Arts for Transit talk at the Society of Illustrator last Saturday. Thank you Greg Ruth for recommending me to Amy. Last but not least, thank you Amy and Lydia for this great project and all the creative freedom any illustrator could ever wanted! 

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ecarian:

mikayel:

The Little Matchgirl

A little insight! This is a “children’s book” set in the time of the Industrial Revolution.

A young girl has to go out and sell matches and is not allowed to come back until she does because her father is an abusive drunk to her and her siblings. Their mother is dead. On this particular day, she can NOT sell her matches so she retreats to a corner but it’s winter so it is dreadfully cold. With ever match she lights, she dreams of Christmas related things such as a well decorated tree or a Christmas dinner. But she can’t have them because she is too poor. With her last match, she dreams of spending time with her grandmother on Christmas but it fades too soon. That being her last one, she goes to sleep but her grand mother retrieves her.

If you couldn’t recognize it in the last gif, the girl has frozen to death.

oh my gosh

Here’s a link to the video

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Hallgrímskirkja, Reykjavik, Iceland

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typhonatemybaby:

dbvictoria:

A Janitor Secretly Worked On This For 7 Years. No One Knew Til Now… And It’s Baffling Everyone.

Over 30 years ago, a man spent 7 years hand-drawing the most complex, unbelievable and probably unsolvable maze I’ve ever seen. His daughter recently posted the following photos on Twitter and, needless to say, the entire Internet is exploding with questions about her dad.

So who is the man behind it? A professor? A mathematician? A wizard? No, no, and no. The correct answer is… the university janitor.

I FUCKING LOVE WHEN THIS KIND OF THING SURFACES

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uispeccoll:

absolumentmoderne:

In case you’ve forgotten, Kim Beck has a track record of making beautiful books. Treasure my copy of “A Field Guide to Weeds,” which she also worked on with Printed Matter, Inc. 

Support Kim’s next book here!

Kickstarter projects for book arts exist!

Hey, Kim was one of my professors! This book is great!

joncarling:

heart eater
You are seriously one of my favourite illustrators, I came across your work during a discussion at Kingston Uni and I've been fangirling over your work ever since. I was wondering whether you have any advice on working as an illustrator in London post-uni?
ASKED BY iellas

ricardobessa:

WHOA WHOA hold up, a discussion in Kingston Uni? In which my work was mentioned? MY Kingston Uni?

uuuuuh *messages you privately*

Anyway….. I had a lot written already and tumblr ate my text. Fuck. The gist of it was, your work seems to be pretty good, so you’ve got that covered, now you just need to 

1) figure out who would hire you to do the type of illustration you want to do

2) send them e-mails/postcards/flowers/all of the above to let them you know you exist

Really, that’s basically it, a matter of putting in the time to do this regularly - research and collect data that you can use. I’ve gotten into this habit: whenever I check out someone’s work and they mentioned who/what they did for, I add this info to a handy google doc I keep. Did they do something cool for a magazine? Do they mention the name of the Art Director? Look them up, add it to the spreadsheet and send them a postcard when it’s postcard time. That’s why I think it’s really cool when illustrators add the AD’s name to their work descriptions and I to to do the same.

If you’re at a loss of where to start, the AOI directories could be a good start. If you think the price is a bit steep, you can always go halfsies with an illustrator friend, that’s what I did. I built up from that list with my own research.

(And pro-tip - when doing this, be self aware. Try to contact people who would use the type of work you produce. A well-aimed batch of 20 postcards may wield better results of 100 randomly sent ones.)

I hope this helped. I’m only starting out myself, so I’m not exactly a gold mine of wisdom. But regardless, good luck! :)

victongai:

Confucius Comes Home

Victo Ngai

This image ran in the New Yorker Dec 23 issue, all the holiday food went to my head and I forgot to post about it.

This article by Evan Osnos talks about a sudden enthusiasm of Confucius possibly due to the “moral and spiritual vacancy in China" right now.

Universities had unveiled high-prices courses for entrepreneurs who sought “commercial wisdom” in the classics. “International Confucius Festival” is launched. In which thousands of people fill a local stadium in his hometown; giant balloons floated overhead bearing the names of ancient scholars, and a Korean pop star in abbreviated outfit, delivers a rock performance. Even the Chinese government, which has condemned Confucius for decades, took a sharp turn and embraced the scholar by opening “Confucius Institute” around the globe, preaching the government’s angle on sensitive political issues.  An “official”, “standardized” and “modernized” portrait of the scholar has also been established.

Many Chinese intellects express their disappointment in the current manufactured Confucius, criticizing how meaning and ideologies have been forced out of his writing to better suit the current social and political purposes. 

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inja-y-ddraig:

inkfromtheoctopus:

The Adventures of Prince Achmen.1926. German.The oldest surviving animated film in history.

Nonono, you don’t understand how AWESOME this movie is
because it’s not done by a big production firm, or someone with a name as big as Walt Disney, no
the writer and “mind” behind this film was a WOMAN
yes, my dear tumblr peeps, the very first trick animator in the world was a young German woman who had an idea, and enough friends and time to make a feature-length animated film. And it took her three years
because the way this movie (and some shorter works she actually did before Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed) are done is really, really complex. You see those leaves, and the hair of the figures? Yes.
That’s hand-cut paper.
Lotte Reiniger - that’s her name, my friends - always loved the art beind the Chinese shadow puppetry, and after she heard a lecture by Paul Wegener (famous vor the early movies Der Golem and Der Student von Prag) about the possibilites of animated movies, she wanted to combine these two things.
And guys, how she combined it…
Most of the puppets and scenerey she made all by herself. Her friends set up a special table that was lighted from underneath, and in the later movies she would even change the colours of the background mid-scene to change the atmosphere. Above it was a camera, shooting photos of the scenes that she moved milimetre for milimetre for those 16 pictures per second she needed for her movie.
Which makes Die Abenteuer von Prinz Achmed not only the first animated feature-length movie, but also the first stop-motion movie.

inja-y-ddraig:

inkfromtheoctopus:

The Adventures of Prince Achmen.
1926. German.
The oldest surviving animated film in history.

Nonono, you don’t understand how AWESOME this movie is

because it’s not done by a big production firm, or someone with a name as big as Walt Disney, no

the writer and “mind” behind this film was a WOMAN

yes, my dear tumblr peeps, the very first trick animator in the world was a young German woman who had an idea, and enough friends and time to make a feature-length animated film. And it took her three years

because the way this movie (and some shorter works she actually did before Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed) are done is really, really complex. You see those leaves, and the hair of the figures? Yes.

That’s hand-cut paper.

Lotte Reiniger - that’s her name, my friends - always loved the art beind the Chinese shadow puppetry, and after she heard a lecture by Paul Wegener (famous vor the early movies Der Golem and Der Student von Prag) about the possibilites of animated movies, she wanted to combine these two things.

And guys, how she combined it…

Most of the puppets and scenerey she made all by herself. Her friends set up a special table that was lighted from underneath, and in the later movies she would even change the colours of the background mid-scene to change the atmosphere. Above it was a camera, shooting photos of the scenes that she moved milimetre for milimetre for those 16 pictures per second she needed for her movie.

Which makes Die Abenteuer von Prinz Achmed not only the first animated feature-length movie, but also the first stop-motion movie.